Interactive Puzzles - Animal Park at Conservators Center
Educational Resources

Interactive Puzzles

Can You Complete These Puzzles of Our Animal Residents?

Below you will find a variety of puzzles, ranging in difficulty, of our current animal residents. Enjoy putting together pictures and learning about our lemurs, lynxes, binturongs, wolves, leopards, and more! Select your preferred level of difficulty and click the button on the left to launch the puzzle.

Created with all age ranges in mind, these puzzles are perfect to do on a tablet/iPad, a mobile device, desktops, or a laptop device!

Select Puzzle Difficulty

Eurasian Lynx


Blitz is one of our three Eurasian Lynxes. He can be found lounging on one of his high platforms, watching the entire small side of the park, including his neighbors, Casper Arctic Fox and Sash Binturong. Blitz is known for his riveting green eyes that can at times be hard to find as his coat helps him blend in with his surroundings.


Giant Flemish Rabbit


Delilah is one of our animals in the Education Room that always manages to get gasps of awe from adults and children alike! Giant Flemish Rabbits are the largest breeds of rabbits, and ones like Delilah can weigh an impressive 15 pounds. Females, like our Delilah, usually have folds of skin under their chin, known as dewlaps, that help keep their offspring warm..


Arctic Fox


Arctic foxes can survive frigid temperatures, as cold as -58°F in the Arctic. Much like cats, these foxes use their thick tails to aid in their balance. Although they are effective hunters, they have been known to follow the top predator of the region, the Polar Bear, to scavenge any scraps left behind from the Polar Bears hunts.


Ring-Tailed Lemur


Lemurs are primates found only on the island of Madagascar. Unlike some of their primate cousins, lemurs cannot use their tail to help grip when they swing through trees. Ring-tailed lemurs have scent glands, which they use to mark their territory. During mating season, males get into 'stink' fights. This means the males rub their tails with their scent before waving them around. Whoever has the "stinkiest" scent is deemed the most powerful.


Fennec Fox


Tut is our male Fennec Fox and you can often find him curled up tight right against the window of his warm habitat. Fennec Foxes are one of the smaller canids and are native to the Sahara and other sandy areas of North Africa. They are most recognizable by their overly large ears that seem disproportionate to their smaller bodies. Their ears are used to radiate their body heat, helping keep them cool in their warmer climate.

Ball Python


Simon is one of our Education Room animals. Ball Python snakes are carnivores and as their name denotes, they like to curl into tight balls. No two snakes share the same colorful pattern--each one is unique to that snake. Ball Pythons are considered sacred in various tribes throughout their native region of North and Central Africa.


Gray Wolves


Trekkie and Roland Wolves are brothers and share their habitat with our new wolf pups, Sitka and Rayne. Trekkie and Roland can be at times hard to tell apart, but Trekkie is a bit taller, leaner, and his coat is whiter. Roland can often be found observing visitors from his platform, as Trekkie usually greets them with enthusiasm. While Trekkie is the 'alpha' wolf, he does still enjoy playing and acting goofy with Roland, though they’ve both taken on more serious roles since the arrival of our wolf pups, Sitka and Rayne.


African Serval


Carson is one of our easier to spot servals, as he has a very distinct wide pink stripe down the center of his nose. He currently resides in his habitat with a female serval, Akai. Of all the cats, servals have the longest legs and largest ears compared to its body size. These long legs help them jump 9-12 feet in the air to grab or pounce on their prey.


Gray Wolf


Sitka Wolf and his sister Rayne Wolf, arrived at the Park this past summer. Sitka and Rayne are British Columbian wolves, a subspecies of gray wolf. Though Sitka is not a year old, he already weighs more than Rayne, and both of our other male wolves, Trekkie and Roland. Sitka enjoys attention from his admirers and also enjoys playing with his sister, even if she tends to get him in trouble with the older wolves!


Caracal


Naja is our beautiful female caracal who shares her habitat with Asher Caracal. Although Asher is younger than Naja, she still indulges in his goofy games and at times can be found laying with him on their swinging platform. Caracal comes from the Turkish words 'kara kulak', which means black ear. They are also known in some regions as the 'rooikat' which means "red cat" in Afrikaans.

Eurasian Lynx


Eurasian lynxes can be quite secretive predators, meaning that they can go unnoticed by people in their territory for years. Our Annika Eurasian Lynx likes to show off this trait, as you can walk by her habitat without spotting her, but then turn back around and she'll be right there, flashing her green eyes in hopes of receiving some tasty treats or scent enrichment.


Southeast Asian Binturong


Sash is a male binturong who enjoys treats of fresh bananas and sweet grapes. Widely nicknamed 'bearcats', binturongs do look like a fascinating combination of those two animals. Binturongs are keystone species, meaning that their presence in their native region, which are the rainforests of Southeast Asia, is crucial for the ecosystem.


African Leopards


Ramsey and Savannah are brother and sister leopards who enjoy lounging in their beautiful habitat that includes two tall spires for them to climb, giving them the ability to look out over the entire Animal Park. Leopards have numerous dark “florets” made of two or three flower petal shapes in a circle on their backs and upper limbs, and single spots on their faces, lower limbs, and bellies. Every leopard has a unique spot pattern, just like a human fingerprint!


African Lion


Ra is known at the Animal Park as the resident 'Fabio' as it appears he knows he’s being admired when he poses for photos. Ra enjoys starting various 'oofs' throughout the day and at times will refuse to answer back if he was not the lion to start the 'oof.' Lions are known to rest anywhere from 20-22 hours a day—what a life!


New Guinea Singing Dog


Sweetness is one of our New Guinea Singing Dogs who arrived at the Animal Park in 2016. She is the perfect companion for our Marlin NGSD. The two bonded very quickly after Marlin realized that feisty Sweetness, despite her name, was truly the boss in that relationship. New Guinea Singing Dogs have a spine and joints that are very flexible for a dog, which makes them able to jump and climb much like a cat.

African Lions


Adeena & Willow are sisters through and through. Not only do they pick on each other, they can usually be found laying together and are sure to both join in when an "oofing" starts. Willow usually watches her sister, waiting with an open mouth to ensure that she gets the last 'word' in. These two girls are particularly fond of rubbing all over scent enrichment, especially peppermint!


Asiatic Tiger


Wic is our male tiger, who has always been a strong and independent cat. His full name, Wicininnish, means “no one in front of him in the canoe.” How convenient that his stripes form a giant W on one of his cheeks, so he is easy to tell apart from other tigers! Although many felines do not actively enjoy water, tigers do enjoy swimming and playing in water. Wic can often be found lounging or goofily splashing around in his large pool during the warmer months.


Geoffroy's Cat


Renato arrived at the Animal Park as a young kitten with our Naja Caracal. The two were raised together, but when Naja was older she decided she'd much rather play with other caracals or be on her own. Renato now has his own habitat and especially relishes watching visitors on Twilight Tours, when he is most active. Geoffroy's Cats, from Southern and Central South America, can grow up to around 15 pounds, but our fully grown Renato weighs only about 7 pounds.


North American Coyote


Sullivan, or Sulli, is our male coyote who was mistaken for a domestic pup by a local hunter, who took him home. Coyotes are native to North America and have very few natural predators. Coyotes often hunt in pairs or alone, and have a variety of vocalizations that help them locate or track members of their family or their pack. Their calls shift frequency often so a group may sound much larger than it is. Sulli often sings along with our wolf pack and dingoes.


Jungle Cat


Aten is quite the vocal Jungle Cat, his vocalizations being heard at the Park at various times throughout the day, especially if he wants attention or is seeking some treats! Jungle Cat vocalizations vary from deep “woah” sounds like an odd bark to normal cat purr. Aten will call very loudly to draw everyone’s attention before then switching to a more quiet 'wow' like vocalization for his approaching visitors. A few Jungle Cat mummies are said to have been found in Egyptian tombs.

African Lion


Hansen leads his pride composed of sisters Willow and Adeena, but is not far from his brothers' habitat, Pacino and Gryffindor. In the morning the three brothers can usually be found sitting close together, communing. Lions engage in a vocalization we refer to as "oofing," which is a way that prides in the wild loudly communicate their location to each other. Hansen will "oof" with our other lions, but has been caught lip syncing when he is feeling especially lazy!


African Serval


Lena is one of our older servals, having just recently turned 20 years old. She shares her spacious habitat with Sasha and Oz in an area that houses many other servals. Servals, with strikingly large ears and long lean legs, have a hunting success rate of around 48%, which is higher than other members of the cat family. They have even been known to strike faster than a cobra!


South American Kinkajou


Aleco is our male kinkajou, is over 20 years old, and lives with his companion, Abigail. Kinkajous are sometimes referred to as 'honey bears.' This is because they can use their long, skinny tongue to remove honey from bee-hives. They also will remove pests found in hives or rotting logs, such as termites. Kinkajous are nocturnal, so they are awake for Twilight Tour visitors, and are usually interested to see if the group has brought scent enrichment. Aleco and Abigail will usually wake up for our keepers if they bring them some fresh fruits during daylight.


Australian Dingo


Melbourne, affectionately nick-named Melly, shares a habitat with her brother, Bear. Dingoes have long been known as Australia's wild dog, but were introduced to the Australian continent from Asia some 4-5,000 years ago. Though many have golden or reddish colored coats, our dingoes both have their beautiful tri-colored coats. In Australia they are sometimes considered pests because they will harm livestock like sheep, goats, and even cattle.


North American Bobcat


Muraco is our young male Bobcat, and he shares his habitat with Arya. These two young bobcats can at times be found snuggled together in their den-box or playfully wrestling around their platforms. Arya is much like bobcats in the wild, in that she is primarily nocturnal. Muraco seems to show no regard for those habits as you can find him at all times of the day and night purring for visitors or watching out for the arrival of some fun enrichment toys, like a new tunnel to run through!

Educational Resources

Interactive Puzzles

Can You Complete These Puzzles of Our Animal Residents?

Below you will find a variety of puzzles, ranging in difficulty, of our current animal residents. Enjoy putting together pictures and learning about our lemurs, lynxes, binturongs, wolves, leopards, and more! Select your preferred level of difficulty and click the button on the left to launch the puzzle.

Created with all age ranges in mind, these puzzles are perfect to do on a tablet/iPad, a mobile device, desktops, or a laptop device!

Select Puzzle Difficulty

Eurasian Lynx


Blitz is one of our three Eurasian Lynxes. He can be found lounging on one of his high platforms, watching the entire small side of the park, including his neighbors, Casper Arctic Fox and Sash Binturong. Blitz is known for his riveting green eyes that can at times be hard to find as his coat helps him blend in with his surroundings.


Giant Flemish Rabbit


Delilah is one of our animals in the Education Room that always manages to get gasps of awe from adults and children alike! Giant Flemish Rabbits are the largest breeds of rabbits, and ones like Delilah can weigh an impressive 15 pounds. Females, like our Delilah, usually have folds of skin under their chin, known as dewlaps, that help keep their offspring warm..


Arctic Fox


Arctic foxes can survive frigid temperatures, as cold as -58°F in the Arctic. Much like cats, these foxes use their thick tails to aid in their balance. Although they are effective hunters, they have been known to follow the top predator of the region, the Polar Bear, to scavenge any scraps left behind from the Polar Bears hunts.


Ring-Tailed Lemur


Lemurs are primates found only on the island of Madagascar. Unlike some of their primate cousins, lemurs cannot use their tail to help grip when they swing through trees. Ring-tailed lemurs have scent glands, which they use to mark their territory. During mating season, males get into 'stink' fights. This means the males rub their tails with their scent before waving them around. Whoever has the "stinkiest" scent is deemed the most powerful.


Fennec Fox


Tut is our male Fennec Fox and you can often find him curled up tight right against the window of his warm habitat. Fennec Foxes are one of the smaller canids and are native to the Sahara and other sandy areas of North Africa. They are most recognizable by their overly large ears that seem disproportionate to their smaller bodies. Their ears are used to radiate their body heat, helping keep them cool in their warmer climate.

Ball Python


Simon is one of our Education Room animals. Ball Python snakes are carnivores and as their name denotes, they like to curl into tight balls. No two snakes share the same colorful pattern--each one is unique to that snake. Ball Pythons are considered sacred in various tribes throughout their native region of North and Central Africa.


Gray Wolves


Trekkie and Roland Wolves are brothers and share their habitat with our new wolf pups, Sitka and Rayne. Trekkie and Roland can be at times hard to tell apart, but Trekkie is a bit taller, leaner, and his coat is whiter. Roland can often be found observing visitors from his platform, as Trekkie usually greets them with enthusiasm. While Trekkie is the 'alpha' wolf, he does still enjoy playing and acting goofy with Roland, though they’ve both taken on more serious roles since the arrival of our wolf pups, Sitka and Rayne.


African Serval


Carson is one of our easier to spot servals, as he has a very distinct wide pink stripe down the center of his nose. He currently resides in his habitat with a female serval, Akai. Of all the cats, servals have the longest legs and largest ears compared to its body size. These long legs help them jump 9-12 feet in the air to grab or pounce on their prey.


Gray Wolf


Sitka Wolf and his sister Rayne Wolf, arrived at the Park this past summer. Sitka and Rayne are British Columbian wolves, a subspecies of gray wolf. Though Sitka is not a year old, he already weighs more than Rayne, and both of our other male wolves, Trekkie and Roland. Sitka enjoys attention from his admirers and also enjoys playing with his sister, even if she tends to get him in trouble with the older wolves!


Caracal


Naja is our beautiful female caracal who shares her habitat with Asher Caracal. Although Asher is younger than Naja, she still indulges in his goofy games and at times can be found laying with him on their swinging platform. Caracal comes from the Turkish words 'kara kulak', which means black ear. They are also known in some regions as the 'rooikat' which means "red cat" in Afrikaans.

Eurasian Lynx


Eurasian lynxes can be quite secretive predators, meaning that they can go unnoticed by people in their territory for years. Our Annika Eurasian Lynx likes to show off this trait, as you can walk by her habitat without spotting her, but then turn back around and she'll be right there, flashing her green eyes in hopes of receiving some tasty treats or scent enrichment.


Southeast Asian Binturong


Sash is a male binturong who enjoys treats of fresh bananas and sweet grapes. Widely nicknamed 'bearcats', binturongs do look like a fascinating combination of those two animals. Binturongs are keystone species, meaning that their presence in their native region, which are the rainforests of Southeast Asia, is crucial for the ecosystem.


African Leopards


Ramsey and Savannah are brother and sister leopards who enjoy lounging in their beautiful habitat that includes two tall spires for them to climb, giving them the ability to look out over the entire Animal Park. Leopards have numerous dark “florets” made of two or three flower petal shapes in a circle on their backs and upper limbs, and single spots on their faces, lower limbs, and bellies. Every leopard has a unique spot pattern, just like a human fingerprint!


African Lion


Ra is known at the Animal Park as the resident 'Fabio' as it appears he knows he’s being admired when he poses for photos. Ra enjoys starting various 'oofs' throughout the day and at times will refuse to answer back if he was not the lion to start the 'oof.' Lions are known to rest anywhere from 20-22 hours a day—what a life!


New Guinea Singing Dog


Sweetness is one of our New Guinea Singing Dogs who arrived at the Animal Park in 2016. She is the perfect companion for our Marlin NGSD. The two bonded very quickly after Marlin realized that feisty Sweetness, despite her name, was truly the boss in that relationship. New Guinea Singing Dogs have a spine and joints that are very flexible for a dog, which makes them able to jump and climb much like a cat.

African Lions


Adeena & Willow are sisters through and through. Not only do they pick on each other, they can usually be found laying together and are sure to both join in when an "oofing" starts. Willow usually watches her sister, waiting with an open mouth to ensure that she gets the last 'word' in. These two girls are particularly fond of rubbing all over scent enrichment, especially peppermint!


Asiatic Tiger


Wic is our male tiger, who has always been a strong and independent cat. His full name, Wicininnish, means “no one in front of him in the canoe.” How convenient that his stripes form a giant W on one of his cheeks, so he is easy to tell apart from other tigers! Although many felines do not actively enjoy water, tigers do enjoy swimming and playing in water. Wic can often be found lounging or goofily splashing around in his large pool during the warmer months.


Geoffroy's Cat


Renato arrived at the Animal Park as a young kitten with our Naja Caracal. The two were raised together, but when Naja was older she decided she'd much rather play with other caracals or be on her own. Renato now has his own habitat and especially relishes watching visitors on Twilight Tours, when he is most active. Geoffroy's Cats, from Southern and Central South America, can grow up to around 15 pounds, but our fully grown Renato weighs only about 7 pounds.


North American Coyote


Sullivan, or Sulli, is our male coyote who was mistaken for a domestic pup by a local hunter, who took him home. Coyotes are native to North America and have very few natural predators. Coyotes often hunt in pairs or alone, and have a variety of vocalizations that help them locate or track members of their family or their pack. Their calls shift frequency often so a group may sound much larger than it is. Sulli often sings along with our wolf pack and dingoes.


Jungle Cat


Aten is quite the vocal Jungle Cat, his vocalizations being heard at the Park at various times throughout the day, especially if he wants attention or is seeking some treats! Jungle Cat vocalizations vary from deep “woah” sounds like an odd bark to normal cat purr. Aten will call very loudly to draw everyone’s attention before then switching to a more quiet 'wow' like vocalization for his approaching visitors. A few Jungle Cat mummies are said to have been found in Egyptian tombs.

African Lion


Hansen leads his pride composed of sisters Willow and Adeena, but is not far from his brothers' habitat, Pacino and Gryffindor. In the morning the three brothers can usually be found sitting close together, communing. Lions engage in a vocalization we refer to as "oofing," which is a way that prides in the wild loudly communicate their location to each other. Hansen will "oof" with our other lions, but has been caught lip syncing when he is feeling especially lazy!


African Serval


Lena is one of our older servals, having just recently turned 20 years old. She shares her spacious habitat with Sasha and Oz in an area that houses many other servals. Servals, with strikingly large ears and long lean legs, have a hunting success rate of around 48%, which is higher than other members of the cat family. They have even been known to strike faster than a cobra!


South American Kinkajou


Aleco is our male kinkajou, is over 20 years old, and lives with his companion, Abigail. Kinkajous are sometimes referred to as 'honey bears.' This is because they can use their long, skinny tongue to remove honey from bee-hives. They also will remove pests found in hives or rotting logs, such as termites. Kinkajous are nocturnal, so they are awake for Twilight Tour visitors, and are usually interested to see if the group has brought scent enrichment. Aleco and Abigail will usually wake up for our keepers if they bring them some fresh fruits during daylight.


Australian Dingo


Melbourne, affectionately nick-named Melly, shares a habitat with her brother, Bear. Dingoes have long been known as Australia's wild dog, but were introduced to the Australian continent from Asia some 4-5,000 years ago. Though many have golden or reddish colored coats, our dingoes both have their beautiful tri-colored coats. In Australia they are sometimes considered pests because they will harm livestock like sheep, goats, and even cattle.


North American Bobcat


Muraco is our young male Bobcat, and he shares his habitat with Arya. These two young bobcats can at times be found snuggled together in their den-box or playfully wrestling around their platforms. Arya is much like bobcats in the wild, in that she is primarily nocturnal. Muraco seems to show no regard for those habits as you can find him at all times of the day and night purring for visitors or watching out for the arrival of some fun enrichment toys, like a new tunnel to run through!

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